Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel Report

On November 3rd, 2016, posted in: Cancer 101 by

On September 27, 2016, National Coalition for Cancer Research and One Voice Against Cancer conducted a Congressional briefing to discuss the recommendations of the National Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel.


Under the leadership of Vice President Joseph Bide, the mission of the Cancer Moonshot initiative is to make a decade’s worth of progress in preventing, diagnosing and treating cancer in five years.  The Blue Ribbon Panel was assembled to provide recommendations on the exceptional opportunities that could be accelerated through this initiative.  On September 2, 2016, the Task Force issued a Report which outlines 10 transformative research recommendations to achieve the goal of the Cancer Moonshot Initiative.  This briefing was designed to discuss these recommendations.

Speakers:

• Dr. Clifford Hudis, MD, FACP, FASCO, Chief Executive Officer, American Society of Clinical Oncology (Moderator)
• Dr. Douglas Lowy, Acting Director, National Cancer Institute;
• Dr. Deborah Mayer, Director of Geriatric Health and Director of Cancer Survivorship, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center;
• Ms. Danielle Leach, Senior Director of Government Relations and Advocacy, St. Baldrick’s Foundation; and
• Dr. Ellen Sigal, Chairperson and Founder, Friends of Cancer Research;

 

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Event: Cancer 101

On April 12th, 2016, posted in: Cancer 101 by

National Coalition for Cancer Research: Cancer 101: Cancer “Moonshot” Initiative from Alan Lessig on Vimeo.

The Cancer “Moonshot” Initiative:
New Frontiers in Cancer Exploration

Monday, April 25, 2016
12:00 – 1:30 pm
485 Russell Senate Office Building

President Obama has issued a challenge to galvanize the cancer research and patient communities in the effort against cancer through the “Moonshot” initiative announced in his 2016 State of the Union Address.
Much success in our understanding and ability to combat cancer has been achieved through a sustained and coordinated collaboration of basic, epidemiologic, clinical, behavioral and translational research. This commitment to science has revolutionized our ability to prevent and detect many cancers, and to develop personalized forms of cancer treatment and predict their response with enhanced precision. Yet, as we all know, the fight is far from over as too many people today still suffer and die from cancer in all its forms.
The cancer “Moonshot” initiative is bringing together scientists, oncologists, patient advocates, and representatives of the biopharmaceutical industry with renewed collaborative focus and the ambitious objective of consolidating ten years of cancer research in five years. Achieving this outcome will require unprecedented cooperation by all stakeholders to prioritize and focus on the highest impact emerging and unforeseen scientific pathways of cancer research. These efforts raise a number of important questions that we will address on April 25th, including:
• How will scientists be able to achieve 10 years of research in 5 years?
• What types of research would be most appropriate for expedited research and what will it take to accelerate this work?
• How will this initiative help bring new anti-cancer pharmaceutical/biotechnology products to market faster?
• What is the best approach to overcome barriers that inhibit scientific collaboration and information sharing?
• How will patients participate in the program?
• What will be the “benchmarks” of determining the impact of the initiative?
• How will this set the trajectory for future cancer research?
Please join the National Coalition for Cancer Research for a Roundtable discussion of these and other topics with our distinguished panel of experts:
• Ms. Wendy K.D. Selig, President, National Coalition for Cancer Research;
• Richard L. Schilsky, M.D., FACP, FASCO (Moderator), Chief Medical Officer, American Society of Clinical Oncology;
• Elizabeth Blackburn, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate, President, The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California;
• Michael B. Atkins, M.D., Deputy Director, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, D.C.;
• Otis W. Brawley, M.D., FACP, Chief Medical Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia;
• Sandra Horning, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and head of Global Product Development, Genentech, San Francisco, California; and
• Linnea Olson – Lung Cancer Survivor, Participant in numerous clinical trials, Artist, Boston, Massachusetts.

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More than 1.6 million new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2015. However, according to the American Association for Cancer Research’s Cancer Progress Report 2015, an estimated 50 percent of the 589,430 U.S. cancer deaths expected to occur in 2015 are attributable to preventable causes. Scientists have identified numerous means to avoid or control known cancer-causing factors, including finding pre-cancerous conditions that may become cancer, changes in diet and lifestyle, mitigating environmental risk factors, and utilizing chemoprevention medicines to prevent cancer from forming or to treat a precancerous condition.

Rapid advances in early cancer detection, when cancer treatments are most effective, are saving lives. New and innovative forms of early cancer detection are harnessing advances in personalized medicine to identify cancers at their earliest stages based upon the individual characteristics of each patient. Today, effective screening strategies not only involve existing techniques, including those for breast, lung and colorectal cancer, but also a complementary understanding of the biology of the disease. For example, clinical trials have moved forward to test biomarkers for the early detection of liver, bladder, lung, mesothelioma, and prostate cancer. Groundbreaking forms of imaging now map tissue biochemistry, making it a potentially powerful surveillance tool for early cancer detection.

These are but a few of the new methods scientists and clinicians are utilizing to revolutionize precision-based cancer research and treatment. To learn more about these and other exciting developments in precision cancer research, we cordially invite you to attend this important briefing.

Speakers include:

Wendy K.D. Selig, President, National Coalition for Cancer Research; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, WS Collaborative;

Sudhir Srivastava [Click to view presentation], Ph.D., MPH, Chief, Cancer Biomarkers Research Group, National Cancer Institute.

Daniel Crichton [Click to view presentation], B.S., M.S., Manager, Principal Investigator, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mr. Crichton is also a Principal Investigator of data systems for the NCI Early Detection Research Network;

Mitchell D. Schnall [Click to view presentation], M.D., Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania;

Clifford A. Hudis, M.D. [Click to view presentation], Chief, Breast Medicine Service, and Vice President for Government Relations and Chief Advocacy Officer, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; and

Carolyn R. Aldigé [Click to view presentation], President and Founder, Prevent Cancer Foundation

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With hundreds of new cancer therapies in various stages of clinical development, this is one of the most promising and exciting times in clinical cancer research history. Today, effective therapies are being developed that are also more precision-based and less toxic, causing fewer immediate and long-term side-effects for patients.

For decades, cancer research was aimed at treating cancers that were categorized into types based on the size and appearance of malignant cells seen under a microscope. Today, cancer research is increasingly focused on genomics, screening for molecular features that may predict response or resistance to a drug, molecular imaging, studies of genetic factors that may predict drug toxicity, and harnessing the body’s own immune system to fight tumor cells. Scientists have identified and are now exploring entire families of genetic mutations, including the RAS family, which is associated with approximately one-third of all cancers. The use of bioinformatics is enabling research institutions to collaborate in order to gather large volumes of data that can be utilized for basic, clinical and translational cancer research. These are but a few of the new methods scientists are utilizing to revolutionize precision-based cancer research and treatment.

Speakers included:

Wendy K.D. Selig, President, National Coalition for Cancer Research; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, WS Collaborative

Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS, DSc (Hon), Professor Emeritus, David A. Wood Distinguished Professorship of Tumor Biology and Cancer Research, University of San Francisco Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Scientific Director, National Cancer Institute RAS Initiative

William S. Dalton, Ph.D, M.D., Founder and President of M2Gen®, and former President and CEO of the Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

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With hundreds of new cancer therapies in various stages of clinical development, this is one of the most promising and exciting times in clinical cancer research history. Today, through clinical trials, effective therapies are being developed that are also more targeted and less toxic, causing fewer immediate and long-term side-effects for patients. For decades, clinical trials were aimed at treating cancers that were categorized into types based on the size and appearance of malignant cells seen under a microscope. Whereas, today, cancer clinical trials are focusing on genomics, screening for molecular features that may predict response or resistance to a drug, molecular imaging, studies of genetic factors that may predict drug toxicity, and harnessing the body’s own immune system to fight tumor cells.

These tremendous advances and opportunities in clinical cancer research also raise important public policy questions:
• What are cancer clinical trials, who conducts them, how do they lead to improved outcomes for cancer patients and how are they different from clinical trials for other diseases?
• How have cancer clinical trials evolved in recent years?
• What new areas of clinical cancer research are on the horizon?
• What is it like to be a patient who is participating in a cancer clinical trial?
• What can be done to ensure that the United States maintains its preeminent position as the world leader in medical advances?

Speakers:

Wendy K.D. Selig, President, National Coalition for Cancer Research; President and CEO, Melanoma Research Alliance

Peter J. O’Dwyer, M.D., Director, Developmental Therapeutics Program, Abramson Cancer Center; Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Files: PPT

Ross L. Levine, M.D., Laurence Joseph Dineen Chair in Leukemia Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Files: PPT

Julie R. Brahmer, M.D., Interim Director, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (Bayview campus), Interim Co-Director, Upper Aerodigestive Program, and Associate Professor of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University
Files: PPT

Andrew (Andy) Messinger, Short Hills, New Jersey, cancer survivor and clinical trial participant

Robert L. Comis, M.D., President and Chairman, Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups; Group Co-Chair, ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, and Professor of Medicine, Drexel University
Files: PPT1 | PPT2

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On May 13, 2011 the National Coalition for Cancer Research conducted a “Cancer 101” briefing on the economic benefits of cancer research.

The briefing was to discuss the impact that biomedical research has on federal, state and local economies. The United States leads the world in investing public and private dollars on medical research. In 2007 alone, for example, the United States spent an estimated 4.5 percent of its total health expenditures on biomedical research. But are we getting our money’s worth? Leading health economists will answer with a resounding “yes”: in fact, considering the extraordinary value of improvements to health and the positive impact on the American economy, many believe we may even be spending too little on medical research.

Speakers for the briefing were:

Dr. Jerome Yates, President of the National Coalition for Cancer Research
Dr. Richard Clinch, Director of Economic Research, University of Baltimore
Dr. Donald Trump, President and Chief Executive Officer, Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Documents:
NCCR Economics Briefing – Trump PP
NCCR Cancer Enonomics Briefing – Clinch PP
NCCR Cancer Economics Briefing – Yates Opening

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On April 19, 2010 the National Coalition for Cancer Research conducted a “Cancer 101” briefing to discuss the current and future cancer clinical trials enterprise. The briefing showed how today’s clinical trials are being designed to bring clinical research to more patients and, using sophisticated health information technologies, are already heavily engaged in Comparative Effectiveness Research and personalized medicine. The briefing also focused on regulatory and legal issues that, at times, impede the progress of important clinical trials.

Speakers for the briefing were:

Robert L. Comis, M.D., President and Chairman, Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Michael A. Caligiuri, MD, Center Director, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center –Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, Ohio
Daniel Sullivan, M.D., Executive Vice President & Associate Center Director for Clinical Investigations, Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

Documents:
NCCR_COMIS_Cancer_101_Congressional_Briefing_04-19-10
NCCR Cancer 101 Clincial Trials Yates Remarks
Mike Caligiuri Presentation
Congressional Staff Briefing–Sullivan

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Cancer 101 Congressional Briefing Series

On January 2nd, 2010, posted in: Cancer 101 by

The National Coalition for Cancer Research “Cancer 101” Congressional Briefing Series has conducted other presentations on variety of topics related to cancer research.  These include:

·         Cancer Stem Cells: Opportunities to Advance Cancer Research and Discovery

·         From the Bench to the Bedside: The Process of Cancer Therapeutics Discovery

·         Advances in Gynecologic Cancer Research: Pathways to Discovery, Diagnosis and Treatment

·         America’s Nursing Shortage: Implications for Cancer Research

·         Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Cancer Research and Treatment

·         Cancer Biomarkers: Opening New Frontiers in Cancer Research

·         The Unequal Burden of Cancer:  Different Diseases – Different Results

 

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